Foster the People tackle rock anthems and gun violence at the Fillmore

Taking their 'Sacred Hearts Club' tour to Charlotte, the alt-rockers deliver a sensational performance with profound meaning

| October 4, 2017 | 0 Comments


Photos by Leysha Caraballo .

Finding my way back at the Fillmore this month, as the alternative rock-pop outfit Foster the People rolled through with their ‘Sacred Hearts Club’ tour, I was treated once more to a satisfying night to remember. Pulling together not only the biggest hits off their third album, but also a handful of catchy singles from records past, the psychedelic rockers took the stage to deliver a fist-pumping, head-rocking good time. In light of the events of Las Vegas this week, however, Mark Foster and his crew also sent up a powerful message that made the night all the more unforgettable.

The tragic events of Sunday’s Las Vegas shooting weren’t the only subjects of Foster the People’s emotional performance, as they began their set with the echoes of Tom Petty’s “I Won’t Back Down” booming across the eager crowd. Honoring the late musician who passed away this week, the crowd roared with a noise of melancholy and pure joy. Even before Mark Foster, clad in leather, leaped onto the stage, the room was already stirring with a deep set of emotion and excitement.

Breaking out with their opening hit, “Pay the Man,” the Los Angeles-based rockers quickly reminded me just how fantastic and diverse their newest record truly is. Even as they merged their past hits like “Helena Beat” and “Coming of Age” with one dynamic cover of the Ramones’ “Blitzkrieg Bop,” it was their newest songs that really pumped up the crowd. As they rolled effortlessly through “Doing It For the Money” and the punk-rock anthem “Lotus Eater,” Foster and the band commanded the stage with a sensational energy.

Even as the adrenaline in the room quickly rose, the band did leave a number of moments for silence and reflection. Allowing the audience to collect their thoughts of confusion, anger and sadness in quieter moments of the performance, the band set the mood for a night of both dynamic rock music and profound meaning as well. Pausing the show to deliver his thoughts on the horrifying events of Las Vegas just days before, frontman Mark Foster rallied behind the unity and love that remains paramount to a world in such troubled times as these.

As the echoes of “Sit Next to Me” and the words of Foster still rung in my ears, the night closed with an even more meaningful message that left a peculiar smile on my face. As the band declined to play their iconic debut hit “Pumped Up Kicks” due to its subject of gun violence, the group ended the night with a phenomenal cover of John Lennon’s “Love.” Conveying their solidarity in reaction to the recent events of terror in the nation, as well as their heartfelt ideal that music unites people like nothing else, Foster the People gave Charlotte a euphoric night that let their music speak volumes.

Foster the People are set to continue their worldwide tour for their third studio album “Sacred Hearts Club” into the new year. Be sure to check out my review of their latest album here.

Tags:, , , , , , ,

Category:Arts and Entertainment, Events, Music

Tyler Trudeau is a sophomore Architecture major from Raleigh, NC, who spends most of his time writing about movies, running in 90 degree heat, and bingeing Netflix shows. You can find more of his film criticism and editorials at his personal website below.

Twitter Author's Website

Comments

Tyler Trudeau is a sophomore Architecture major from Raleigh, NC, who spends most of his time writing about movies, running in 90 degree heat, and bingeing Netflix shows. You can find more of his film criticism and editorials at his personal website below.

Twitter Author's Website