‘Indeterminate Coordinates’: A Theatre for the Architectural Mind

Architect/Artist Perry Kulper blends design with art in the Storrs Gallery

| January 23, 2017
Artwork courtesy of Perry Kulper; Image by Tyler Trudeau

Artwork from Pamphlet 34 courtesy of Perry Kulper; Image by Tyler Trudeau

Debuting his work, “Indeterminate Coordinates,”  in the Storrs Gallery this weekend, architect-turned-artist Perry Kulper lends his work to the College of Arts and Architecture not simply for its appeal to design students, but also for its massive sense of self-awareness in the ever-changing culture we all occupy. Breathing a new life into our preconceptions of art and design, intermingling cultural flavor and articulate methods of investigation in his work, Kulper delivers an elegant — and at times messy — peek into the way he creates art from the unknown. It is what he calls a “bi-product of working.”

Being an architecture student myself, as well as a recurring fan of any kind of art form that pushes beyond the ordinary, Perry Kulper’s intriguing display of some 77 drawings he’s crafted in the past 20 years instantly caught my eye. Said drawings, a fluent mix of paint splatters across landscapes and charcoal doorways leading to nowhere, were an era I imagine didn’t entirely exist yet. Listening to the words of Kulper, it appeared they were just that. The drawings, as obscure and provocative as they were, proved to be bi-products of Kulper’s imagination spanning weeks, months, years, even decades into both the past and the future. Quickly realizing it, I discovered the majority of Kulper’s works, some detailing tropes of the past, others leaving the canvas nearly blank as to tease something more, were a not only capturing moments in time,  but creating them as well.

Photo by Allison Tran.

Photo by Allison Tran.

That being said, you don’t have to be an artist or an architect to uncover that truth. Entering the gallery Friday, I was met with a flood of not only wide-eyed college students, but countless professors and others caught in the web of Kulper’s fascinating studies. That notion, that one man’s abstract string of thoughts put to paper could attract such an audience, provided me with a great sense of enlightenment. With that, I realized that not only were Kulper’s constructive and conservative pieces bi-products of work and time, they were also products of culture. As Kulper described it, it was his cross-breeding of off-kilter phenomena, spacial territories, hybrid meanings that fed into making his art readable and relatable to anyone. That aspiration, which appeared undeniably intentional in nearly all his work, is what truly matured his unique drawings into what he calls “curiosity cabinets of ideas.”

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‘David’s Island’ courtesy of Perry Kulper; Image by Tyler Trudeau

Curious, daring, evocative, and undeniably evolving as I type, Kulper’s investigation into his mind, his surroundings, and the cultural tropes that exist in between can all be appreciated in the architect’s latest collection of works. Providing a sense of ambiguity and complexity, while also portraying contextualized layouts that blur the line between the organic and the geometric, Kulper’s work represents a slew of points and lines lost in time, but undeniably leading the mind to places it never dreamed possible.

‘Indeterminate Coordinates’ occupies the Storrs Gallery from January 20th through February

For more information of Perry Kulper and his work, visit here

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Category:Art, Arts and Entertainment

Tyler Trudeau is a freshman Architecture major from Raleigh, NC, who spends most of his time writing about movies, running in 90 degree heat, and bingeing Netflix shows. Check out his other work of film criticism and editorials at his personal website below.

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Tyler Trudeau is a freshman Architecture major from Raleigh, NC, who spends most of his time writing about movies, running in 90 degree heat, and bingeing Netflix shows. Check out his other work of film criticism and editorials at his personal website below.

Twitter Author's Website